Quotes from Books... 2007

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  • Dead Air, Iain Banks

  • But then when we fuck, and I am lost in her, surrendered to those depths beyond mere flesh, nothing could be better, nothing ever has been better, nothing ever will be better. There is no one like her, no one so calm and studied and child-like and innocent and wanton and wise all at once. She thinks I am mad, too, but only for wanting her so much in the first place, not for risking whatever her husband would do to me if he ever found out about us.
  • p 35
  • ... her own bizarre, self-made religion, a belief system without name, ceremony or teachings, which she cleaves to with the airy casualness of the truly convinced, not the fundamentalist intenisty of those who secretly guess they may well be wrong.
  • p 35
  • It is still the land of opportunity, I know that; there's no greater place on Earth to be young and smart and healthy and ambitious. A lot of us Brits affect to be appalled so few Americans have passports, but I've been to the States, I've travelled all over it and I know why they don't; America is a world in itself. The states are like countries, the sheer scale of the place, its variety of climate and landscape; it's stunning, it is truly beautiful. And is there any nation and ethnic group in the world not represented in the States? Americans don't have to go out into the world; the world's already come to them, and you can understand why.
  • p 75
  • Back when I was a teenager, just starting to think for myself, I came up with a very basic formulation. I decided that whenever somebody says, You're either for us or against us, you had to be against them. Because only moral simpletons and outright conniving rogues see, or even claim to see, the world in such preposterously black and white terms.
  • p 77
  • ... but her face was extraordinary; it gave the impression that it belonged to either a teenager who had seen some terrible things in her short existence or a sixty-year-old who'd never had a day's trauma or a single ageing event in her entire life. (sic)
  • p 81
  • Of course, people had been taking mad risks for sex, lust, love, for as long as we'd been people.
  • p 115
  • Seen one, seen 'em all, I reminded myself. But then that, of course, was such shit. Sexists said that the way racists claimed, They all look the same to me. Both were confessions of personal inadequacy, of the inability to really see.
  • p 115
  • 'What do you want to know?'
  • 'Everything about you.'
  • 'Everything would be boring, Kenneth. Don't you know that? Knowing everything about anybody would be boring.'
  • p 120
  • 'Things don't mean what the sayer says, they mean what the listener hears.'
  • p 146
  • '... Liberals want niceness. What the hell is wrong with that? And, bless them, they do it in the teeth of such adversity! The world, people, are disappointing them all the time, constantly throwing up examples of what total shites human beings can be, but liberals just take it all, they hunker down, they grit their sandals and they keep on going; thinking well of people, reading the Guardian, sending cheques to good causes, turning up at marches, getting politely embarrassed by working-class oafism and just generally getting all hot under the collar when they see people being treated badly.
  • p 203
  • '... It's always the one with the most power who has to give up the most, who has to exercise the most restraint, who has to take the final few blows before all the blows stop!'
  • p 238
  • 'That's not the same. I'm just not telling you. You can't compare refusing to tell at all with deliberately telling a lie.
  • 'Yeah, but it's still not being open, is it?'
  • 'So fucking what? You don't have a right to know everything about my private life.'
  • p 324
  • Jitterbug Perfume, Tom Robbins

  • "You're still cute as a button," she told herself. "Of course, I've never seen a cute button, but who am I to argue with the wisdom of the ages?"
  • p 5
  • Modern Romans insited that there was only one god, a notion that struck Alobar as comically simplistic. Worse, this Semitic deity was reputed to be jealous (who was there to be jealous of if there were no other gods?), vindictive, and altogether foul-tempered. If you didn't serve him, the Romans would burn your house down. If you did serve him, you were called a Christian and got to burn other people's houses down.
  • p 29
  • The tail bone frequently is connected to the leer bone, although today that connection is illegal in seventeen states and the District of Columbia.
  • p 46
  • ... while we must go forever in despair, let us also go forever in the enjoyment of the world.
  • p 49
  • ... poorer of some hopes but freer of some illusions...
  • p 63
  • "You know, there's not much that can be done to heal the sting of a woman. As they say in her country, it's easier to scratch your ass than your heart."
  • p 69
  • "I cannot believe that the most delicious things were placed here merely to test us, to tempt us, to make it more difficult for us to capture the grand prize: the safety of the void. To fashion of life such a petty game is unworthy of both men and gods."
  • p 97
  • "To eliminate the agitation and disappointment of desire, we need but awaken to the fact that we have everything we want and need right now."
  • p 105
  • "By identifying with our desires and taking them too seriously, we not only increase our susceptibility to disappointment, we actually create a climate inhospitable to the free and easy fulfillment of those desires."
  • p 107
  • A bartender's beauty is in his moves, in the way he struts his stuff, it the field of rhythms that is set up in the orchestrated hatching of a large order of drinks.
  • p 111
  • The highest function of love is that it makes the loved one a unique and irreplaceable being.
  • The difference between love and logic is that in the eyes of a lover, a toad can be a prince, whereas in the analysis of a logistician, the lover would have to prove that the toad was a prince, an enterprise destined to dull the shine of many a passion.
  • p 131
  • Pan had begun to live in his memories, an unhealthy symptom in anyone, suggesting as it does that life has peaked.
  • p 135
  • They weren't as much fun, anymore, the poor homers; they were straining so desperately for admission to paradise that they had forgotten that paradise had always been their address.
  • p 142
  • The next worst thing to a quarrel is a compromise. They made one at once.
  • p 162
  • Like that rarity, the wise husband, it was strong enough to possess its mate, secure enough to allow her her freedom.
  • p 184
  • "Sure and still you're right about you Cheerful Dumb, only they're not so much happy as lobotomized. But your gloomy Smart are just as ridiculous. When you're unhappy, you get to pay a lot of attention to yourself. And you get to take yourself oh so very seriously. Your truly happy people, which is to say, your people who truly like themselves, they don't think about themselves very much. Your unhappy person resents it when you try to cheer him up, because that means he has to stop dwellin' on himself and start payin' attention to the universe. Unhappiness is the ultimate form o' self-indulgence."
  • p 210
  • Claude LeFever's hand had gone as stiff as Medusa's optometrist.
  • p 222
  • "Yes, God, yes," moaned Pris. This was the way Effecto had loved her: muscular and tender, relaxed and confident, carefully modulating rhythm and tempo, prying her apart with sweet determination, kissing her adoringly all the while; a far cry from those young guys who were either trying to score touchdowns in bed or else practicing to join the tank corps.
  • p 243
  • "The universe does not have laws.
  • "It has habits.
  • "And habits can be broken."
  • p 251
  • "If you want your tree to produce plenty o' fruit, you've got to cut it back from time to time. same thing with your neural cells. Some people might call it brain damage. I call it prunin'."
  • p 252
  • "They want somebody to tell 'em they have a chance at the i-n-g of life and not just the e-d."
  • p 263
  • "nostalgia and hope stand equally in the way of authentic experience"
  • p 299
  • "The rich are the most discriminated-against minority in the world. Openly or covertly, everybody hates the rich because, openly or covertly, everybody envies the rich. Me, I love the rich. Somebody has to love them. Sure, a lot o' rich people are assholes, but believe me, a lot o' poor people are assholes, too, and an asshole with money can at least pay for his own drinks."
  • p 299
  • At birth, we emerge from dream soup.
  • At death, we sink back into dream soup.
  • In between soups, there is a crossing of dry land.
  • Life is a portage.
  • p 302
  • "Oh, Daddy!" she said, "Don't you know that when you die, your soul stops leaving your body?"
  • "Uh, no. What do you mean?"
  • "Our souls are leaving our bodies all the time, silly. That's what all the energy is about."
  • "You mean the energy field around our bodies is the soul being broadcast out of the body?"
  • "Kinda like that."
  • "And at death this transmission stops?"
  • "Yes. Can I have some ice cream?"
  • 303
  • Good Omens, Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman

  • Offer people a new creed with a costume and their hearts and minds will follow.
  • p 26
  • And just when you'd think they were more malignant than ever Hell could be, they could occasionally show more grace than Heaven ever dreamed of. Often the same individual was involved. It was this free-will thing, of course. It was a bugger.
  • p 34
  • ... they did see eye to eye about some of those people who, for one reason or another, were inclined to worship the Prince of Darkness. Crowley always found them embarrassing. You couldn't actually be rude to them, but you couldn't help feeling about them the same way that, say, a Vietnam veteran would feel about someone who wears combat gear to Neighborhood Watch meetings.
  • p 76
  • ... the really important thing to be was yourself, just as hard as you could.
  • p 89
  • The trouble with trying to find a brown-covered book among brown leaves and brown water at the bottom of a ditch of brown earth in the brown, well, grayish light of dawn, was that you couldn't.
  • It wasn't there.
  • p 104
  • Cats, Dog considered, were clearly a lot tougher than lost souls.
  • p 128
  • Newt had always suspected that people who regularly used the word "community" were using it in a very specific sense that excluded him and everyone he knew.
  • p 166
  • A howling mob, reduced to utter fury by her habit of going around being intelligent and curing people, arrived at her house one April evening to find her sitting with her coat on, waiting for them.
  • p 184
  • "God does not play games with His loyal servants," said the Metatron, but in a worried tone of voice.
  • "Whooo-eee," said Crowley. "Where have you been?"
  • p 337
  • And there never was an apple, in Adam's opinion, that wasn't worth the trouble you got into for eating it.
  • p 369
  • There was something else that was obvious in 1985: Terry was a science fiction writer. It was the way his mind worked: the urge to take it all apart, and put it back together in different ways, to see how it all fit together. It was the engine that drove Discworld -- it's not a "what if. . ." or an "if only . . ." or even an "if this goes on . . ."; it was the far more subtle and dangerous "If there was really a . . ., what would that mean? How would it work?"
  • p 376-7
  • Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows, J K Rowling

  • This was their first encounter with the fact that a full stomach meant good spirits; an empty one, bickering and gloom.
  • p 287
  • "It's... he left me a job."
  • "Did he now?" said Aberforth. "Nice job, I hope? Pleasant? Easy? Sort of thing you'd expect an unqualified wizard kid to be able to do without overstretching themselves?"
  • p 561
  • "Of course it is happening inside your head, Harry, but why on earth should that mean that it is not real?"
  • p 723
  • The Shadow Rising, Robert Jordan

  • You could weave silk from pig bristles before you could make a man anything but a man.
  • p 122
  • "My mother says men are different from us. She says we want to be in love, but only with the one we want; a man needs to be in love, but he will love the first woman to tie a string to his heart."
  • p 136-7
  • These books are OBSESSED with comparing men and women.
  • The Dragon Reborn, Robert Jordan

  • "When she was young, her mother arranged a marriage for her with a man she had never even met... She said she spent the first five years raging against him, and the next five scheming to make his life miserable without his knowing who was to blame. It was only years later, she said, when we died, that she realized he really had been the love of her life."
  • p 57
  • "Any fool knows men and women think differently at times, but the biggest difference is this. Men forget, but never forgive; women forgive, but never forget."
  • p 549
  • "Since you ask questions, what would you do to ease birthing?"
  • Mother Guenna snorted. "Apply warm towels, child, and perhaps give her a little whitefennel if it was an especially hard birth. A woman needs no more than that, and a soothing hand. Can't you think of a question any country farmwife could not answer?"
  • p 561
  • The Great Hunt, Robert Jordan

  • ... those who were devious always seemed to take her openness and honesty, her acceptance of everyone, as cunning devices. They were always caught completely off balance when she turned out to mean what she said and say what she meant.
  • p 51
  • Lan said the time to sound most sure was when you were least certain.
  • p 298
  • "She keeps a willow switch on her desk. She says if you can't learn to follow the rules in a civilized way, she will teach you another way."
  • p 357
  • "That one... will always do what is right. No matter who it hurts."
  • p 363
  • "Rhuidean lies in the lands of the Jenn Aiel, the thirteenth clan."
  • p 410 (Heeee. I have an Aiel clan, the 13th! And they train the witches. Heehehehe.)
  • "But men often mistake revenge and killing for justice. They seldom have the stomach for justice."
  • p 648
  • The Redemption of Althalus, David and Leigh Eddings

  • "I didn't cheat her, Althalus. I did love her and I still do."
  • "I thought you are supposed to love only me!"
  • "What a ridiculous idea! Just because I love her, it doesn't mean that I love you the less. My love is boundless, you know."
  • ch 10
  • The Eye of the World, Robert Jordan

  • She was barely tall enough to come up to his chest, but her presence was such that her height seemed the proper one, and he felt ungainly in his tallness.
  • p 27
  • Remember, the price of Aes Sedai help is always smaller than you can believe, always greater than you can imagine.
  • p 507
  • "Two paces to the span," he muttered. "A thousand spans to the mile, four miles to the league..."
  • p 514
  • An Aes Sedai never lies, but the truth she speaks may not be the truth you think you hear.
  • p 644
  • "Light, you've made me say more than is proper already. Will you shame me to the point of asking you?"
  • p 731
  • Every woman is an Aes Sedai.
  • p 776
  • Thud, Terry Pratchett

  • "Yeah, but..." Fred Colon hesitated here. He knew in his heart that spinning upside down around a pole wearing a costume you could floss with definitely was not Art, and being painted lying on a bed wearing nothing but a smile and a small bunch of grapes was good solid Art, but putting your finger on why this was the case was a bit tricky.
  • "No urns," he said at last.
  • p 40
  • "He had to beg for paints in the street, hwhich [sic] took up a lot of his time, since not many people have a tube of burnt umber on them."
  • p 41
  • "War, Nobby. Huh! What is it good for?" he said.
  • "Dunno, Sarge. Freeing slaves, maybe?"
  • "Absol - well, okay."
  • "Defending yourself against a totalitarian aggressor?"
  • "All right, I'll grant you that, but - "
  • "Saving civilization from a horde of - "
  • "It doesn't do any good in the long run is what I'm saying, Nobby, if you'd listen for five seconds together," said Fred Colon sharply.
  • "Yeah, but in the long run, what does, Sarge?"
  • p 50-1
  • Vimes sighed. He hated games. They made the world look too simple.
  • p 66
  • The nose was also the only organ that could see backwards in time.
  • p 168
  • Coffee was only a way of stealing time that should by rights belong to your slightly older self.
  • p 186
  • Brick wasn't telling lies. Brick had enough trouble dealing with things that weren't made up.
  • p 208
  • The pillar of flame that was Lady Sybil said, in an authoritative voice that brooked no disobeying:
  • "Lie down, Sam. Right now." And Sybil dropped to the sandy floor as, all down the lines of pens, dragon heads rose on long dragon necks.
  • Their nostrils were flaring. They were breathing in.
  • They'd been challenged. They'd been offended. And they'd just had their supper.
  • "Good boys," said Sybil, from the floor.
  • p 233
  • Fun. What is it good for?
  • It's not pleasure, joy, delight, enjoyment, or glee. It's a hollow, cruel, vicious little bastard, a word for something sought with a hilarious couple of wobbly antennae on your head and the words I WANT IT! on your shirt, and it tends to leave you waking up with your face stuck to the street.
  • p 274
  • She'd announce at lunch, "We must have the pork tonight, it needs eating up." Vimes never had an actual problem with this, because he'd been raised to eat what was put in front of him, and do it quickly, too, before someone else snatched it away. He was just puzzled at the suggestion that he was there to do the food a favor.
  • p 287
  • Vimes did his best, but he could never keep track of them. A web of correspondence held them all together, and he marveled at Sybil's ability to be concerned over the problems of a child, whom she'd never met, of a woman she hadn't seen in twenty-five years. It was a female thing.
  • p 315
  • ... I'm pretty sure this is how Karen feels sometimes about my circle of Online Mom Bloggers.... Only maybe not. She may try to deny it, but she is female, too.
  • And his mind worked fast, flying in emergency supplies of common sense, as human minds do, to construct a huge anchor in sanity and prove that what happened hadn't really happened and, if it had happened, hadn't happened much.
  • p 351
  • Theif of Time, Terry Pratchett

  • "But it is essential for humans to use the personal pronoun. It divides the universe into two parts. The darkness behind the eyes, where the little voice is, and everything else. It is... a horrible feeling. It is like being... questioned, all the time."
  • p 159-160
  • Lady LeJean was being strong.
  • She'd never realized how much humans were controlled by their bodies. the thing nagged night and day. It was always too hot, too cold, too empty, too full, too tired....
  • p 194
  • "Look, that's why there's rules, understand? So that you think before you break 'em."
  • p 205
  • Always put off until tomorrow something which, tomorrow, you could put off until, let's say, next year.
  • p 213
  • "You've never been tempted by the prospect of marriage, old man?" said War, when she'd gone.
  • NO. ABSOLUTELY NOT. IN NO WAY.
  • "Why not?"
  • Death was nonplussed. It was like asking a brick wall what it thought of dentistry. As a question, it made no sense.
  • p 226
  • Lu-Tze had long considered that everything happens for a reason, except possibly football.
  • p 253
  • Seeing things a human shouldn't have to see makes us human.
  • p 274
  • Maybe, she thought, that was a normal family state in any case. When push came to shove - thank you, Mrs. Ogg, she'd always remember that phrase now - they'd rely on each other automatically, without a thought. Apart from that, they kept out of one another's way.
  • p 355
  • Fast Women, Jennifer Crusie

  • The moon came through the skylight and backlit Chloe's short blonde curls, making her look angelically lovely. Too bad she was insane.
  • p 22
  • "She's a Pisces. They never get what they want."
  • p 62
  • Oh, really??
  • "The value of the male is based on money. The value of the female is based on youth and beauty. Men can always get more money, but women can't get back those years when they're gone. That's why they take men to the cleaners in a divorce."
  • p 78
  • .... Hm. So, what they're saying is I should have married a man first, and then fallen for a woman later in my life, when no man will want me.
  • [On holiday stress] "It's all that expectation. Everybody wants to live in a Norman Rockwell painting, and everybody's really living in The Scream. It gets to people."
  • p 304
  • There was nothing like sex to remind you that you were an animal.
  • p 370
  • Heh.
  • That was the problem with marriage. It sunk its hooks into your soul and left scars that were with you forever. They should warn the people who were getting married about what it was going to do to them. How it shaped your life and changed your mind and altered your reality until you didn't know who you were anymore. How it hooked you on the presence of another person, maybe somebody you didn't even like very much, maybe somebody you didn't even love anymore, and made you need that person even when you didn't want him at all.
  • p 409
  • "If you can look at somebody and say, 'I never loved you, you were a mistake,' that's one thing. But if you look at him and say, 'You were everything and I poisoned it because I wouldn't stand up for myself,' that's hard. That's too hard."
  • p 446
  • "She means well."
  • "Which is about the worst thing you can say about anybody."
  • p 470-1
  • "I don't think I'm doing that anymore," Suze said. "Of course, I'm pretty gullible. I believe anything I think."
  • p 499
  • "Let's get married for the reason marriage was invented, to make sure we take each other seriously and stick with each other through the bad times and don't quit because that's easier than making it work."
  • p 524
  • Summers at Castle Auburn, Sharon Shinn

  • "So do I wish I was to be king? That is not the question I ask myself. I ask myself, Would I be a good king? Would I be quick-witted and generous of spirit and full of that boundless energy? Or would I be clumsy and stupid and dulled by my own prejudices? I try to be a good man, since I am alive at all, and hope that that teaches me what I would need to know if I was ever faced with a higher challenge. Some days I am more successful at it than others."
  • p 19
  • But there was something else about Elisandra that was even more striking, and that was her air of absolute, unbreakable calm. Even when she spoke and gestured in the course of an ordinary conversation, a great stillness lay behind the animation of her features and the glances of her eyes.
  • p 58
  • All my love rushed back for him, complicated and partisan.
  • "Uncle Jaxon -"
  • p 167
  • "The world makes me sad these days. Things I would not have noticed a year ago seem dreadful to me now. Is that a function of growing older? And will everything seem more dreadful every year, from now until I die?"
  • p 218
  • "... You will be at home. You will be content as you have never been."
  • It was not the words, it was the desire conjured up by her words. Especially for someone like me - who had had too many homes, half homes, partial lives spent between two entirely different worlds - her invitation was almost irresistible. To belong, to be beloved, to go always in sunshine and in peace in a place of eternal beauty....
  • "I have to stay here," I heard myself say, though the words were strangled and unconvinced. "I am not ready to leave the mortal realm."
  • p 288
  • "Do you love me?" he asked.
  • I fell silent.
  • "For the rest of it is glitter and noise," he said. "At the heart of it all is love. You make that choice, and you go forward from there.
  • p 336
  • The Wee Free Men, Terry Pratchett

  • Susurrus... according to her grandmother's dictionary, it meant "a low soft sound, as of whispering or muttering." Tiffany liked the taste of the word.
  • p 4
  • They sold what everyone needed but often didn't want. They sold the key to the universe to people who didn't even know it was locked.
  • "I can't do," said Miss Tick, straightening up. "But I can teach!"
  • p 19
  • "No," said Tiffany patiently. "It's about zoology."
  • "Zoology, eh? That's a big word, isn't it?"
  • "No, actually it isn't," said Tiffany. "Patronizing is a big word. Zoology is really quite short."
  • p 25
  • "Well, I must go. I hope we shall meet again. I will give you some free advice, though."
  • "Will it cost me anything?"
  • "What? I just said it was free!" said Miss Tick.
  • "Yes, but my father said that free advice often turns out to be expensive," said Tiffany.
  • Miss Tick sniffed. "You could say this advice is priceless," she said. "Are you listening?"
  • "Yes," said Tiffany.
  • "Good. Now... if you trust in yourself..."
  • "Yes?"
  • "... and believe in your dreams..."
  • "Yes?"
  • "... and follow your star..." Miss Tick went on.
  • "Yes?"
  • "... you'll still get beaten by people who spent their time working hard and learning things and weren't so lazy. Good-bye."
  • p 51
  • Tiffany knew it was gibbous because she'd read in the Almanack that gibbous meant what the moon looked like when it was just a bit fatter than half full, and so she made a point of paying attention to it around those times just so that she could say to herself: "Ah, I see the moon's very gibbous tonight...."
  • It's possible that this tells you more about Tiffany than she would want you to know.
  • p 65
  • "Okay, lads -- yan... tan... teth'ra!"
  • p 69 (What are the odds I can remember to use this next time I need a count of three?)
  • She tried to pretend she hadn't thought that, but she was treacherously good at spotting when she was lying.
  • p 92
  • "... I'm a toad, so you'll appreciate that I'm having to guess a lot here. Maybe they're just wrong. Maybe you're just wrong. Maybe I'm just wrong."
  • p 137
  • I want that to be true. I don't want to think she's just... gone. Someone like Granny Aching can't just... not be there anymore.
  • p 146
  • "Ach, there I goes again, accidentally nearly throttlin' ye," said Rob Anybody, his hand clamping over Wullie's mouth.
  • p 152
  • Onomatopoeic, she'd discovered in the dictionary, meant words that sounded like the noise of the thing they were describing, like cuckoo. But she thought there should be a word meaning a word that sounds like the noise a thing would make if that thing made a noise even though, actually, it doesn't, but would if it did.
  • p 155
  • "Ye got that little bitty bit inside o' you that holds on, right? The bitty bit that watches the rest o' ye. 'Tis the First Sight and Second Thoughts ye have, and 'tis a wee gift an' a big curse to ye. You see and hear what others canna, the world opens up its secrets to ye, but ye're always like the person at the party with the wee drink in the corner who canna join in. There's a little bitty bit inside ye that willna melt and flow."
  • p 158
  • People who say things like "May all your dreams come true" should try living in one for five minutes.
  • p 257
  • "He said it was better to belong where you don't belong than not to belong where you used to belong, remembering when you used to belong there."
  • p 267
  • "Yes! I'm me! I am careful and logical and I look up things I don't understand! When I hear people use the wrong words, I get edgy! I am good with cheese. I read books fast! I think! And I always have a piece of string!"
  • p 309
  • "Now I know why I never cried for Granny," she said. "She has never left me."
  • p 342
  • Imagine getting stuck like this, she thought. You'd have to wear earplugs and noseplugs and a big black hood over your head, and still you'd see and hear too much...
  • p 345
  • Um... cmo? I take it this is how you've been feeling?
  • "Will you get into trouble, do you think?" she said.
  • "I might," said Tiffany.
  • "Do you want any help?"
  • "If it's my trouble, I'll get out of it," said Tiffany.
  • p 360
  • "The thing about witchcraft," said Mistress Weatherwax, "is that it's not like school at all. First you get the test, and then afterward you spend years findin' out how you passed it. It's a bit like life in that respect."
  • p 361
  • The Lightning Thief, Rick Riordan

  • My mother can make me feel good just by walking into the room. Her eyes sparkles and change color in the light. Her smile is as warm as a quilt. She's got a few gray streaks mixed in with her long brown hair, but I never think of her as old. When she looks at me, it's like she's seeing all the good things about me, none of the bad.
  • p 33
  • Foot racing? No good either. The wood-nymph instructors left me in the dust. They told me not to worry about it. They'd had centuries of practice running away from lovesick gods. But still, it was a little humiliating to be slower than a tree.
  • p 107
  • "But I've never even been to Olympus! Zeus is crazy!"
  • Chiron and Grover glanced nervously at the sky. The clouds didn't seem to be parting around us, as Grover had promised. They were rolling straight over our valley, sealing us in like a coffin lid.
  • "Er, Percy...?" Grover said. "We don't use the c-word to describe the Lord of the Sky."
  • p 136
  • "I thought that would be obvious enough. The entrance to the Underworld is in Los Angeles."
  • p 147
  • When I got to the bottom of the hill, I looked back. Under the pine tree that used to be Thalia, daughter of Zeus, Chiron was now standing in full horse-man form, holding his bow high in salute. Just your typical summer-camp send-off by your typical centaur.
  • p 156
  • In a way, it's nice to know there are Greek gods out there, because you have somebody to blame when things go wrong. For instance, when you're walking away from a bus that's just been attacked by monster hags and blown up by lightning, and it's raining on top of everything else, most people might think that's just really bad luck; when you're a half-blood, you understand that some divine force really is trying to mess up your day.
  • p 168
  • A faint smile played on his lips. "Obedience does not come naturally to you, does it?"
  • "No...sir."
  • "I must take some blame for that, I suppose. The sea does not like to be restrained."
  • p 345
  • She wiped a tear off her check. "You sound so much like your father," she said. "He offered to stop the tide for me once. He offered to build me a palace at the bottom of the sea. He thought he could solve all my problems with a wave of his hand."
  • p 352
  • Stardance, Spider and Jeanne Robinson

  • Simultaneously we roared with laughter, a laughter that blew all the wealth out of the room and let in richness.
  • p 36-7
  • "Nuts. You be your own conscience; I have trouble enough being my own."
  • p 39
  • This is what it is to be human: to strive in the face of the certainty of failure.
  • p 86
  • If captured - don't let them give you to the women.
  • p 98
  • Do the next thing.
  • p 99
  • No wonder the gods smile so seldom - we so often fail to notice.
  • p 121
  • Skinny Dip, Carl Hiaasen

  • At the stroke of eleven on a cool April night, a woman named Joey Perone went overboard from a luxury deck of the cruise liner M.V. Sun Duchess. Plunging toward the dark Atlantic, Joey was too dumbfounded to panic.
  • I married an asshole, she thought, knifing headfirst into the waves.
  • p 3
  • At dinner Chaz had kept refilling Joey's wineglass, over her protests. Now she understood why.
  • She felt it, too, that dehydrated alcohol fatigue. She'd been kicking hard up the crests of the waves and then breast-stroking down the troughs, but now she was losing beth her rhythm and stamina. This wasn't the heated Olympic pool at UCLA; it was the goddamn Atlantic Ocean. Joey scrunched her eyelids to dull the saltwater burn.
  • I had a feeling he didn't love me anymore, she thought, but this is ridiculous.
  • p 6
  • "What's it called when you start hating yourself?"
  • "A waste of energy."
  • p 120
  • "I believe it's never too late to change. I'm eighty-one years old, but I still think I can be a better person tomorrow than I am today. And that's what I'll believe until I run out of tomorrows."
  • p 190
  • "Actually, I'm moving back to Minnesota."
  • "Good for you. And they've got no crime up there?"
  • "Sure, but it's seasonal," Rolvaag said. "Breaking and entering is hard work when it's twenty below. The crowbar tends to freeze to your fingers."
  • p 261

[The teachers] lived rough lives, surviving on what food they could earn from giving lessons to anyone who would listen. When no one would listen, they lived on baked hedgehog. They went to sleep under the stars, which the maths teachers would count, the astronomy teachers would measure and the literature teachers would name. The geography teachers got lost in the woods and fell into bear traps. (p.26)

Tiffany saw it clearly in her head, Granny Aching and this little fat woman, sitting around the pot-bellied stove in the hut on wheels, while the sheep grazed under the stars. (p.145)

'I'm up here most o'the time anyway, because I'm studying to become a gonnagle.' The young Feegle flourished a set of mousepipes. 'An' they willnae let me play doon there on account o'them sayin' my playin' sounds like a spider tryin' to fart through its ears, mistress.'(p.155)

'Tell me what you're not telling me,' said Tiffany.(p.186)

She'd seen pictures of lots of different cheeses in the Almanack. She was good at cheese and had always wondered what the others tasted like. They were faraway cheeses with strange sounding names, cheeses like Treble Wibbley, Waney Tastey, Old Argg, Red Runny and the legendary Lancre Blue, which had to be nailed to the table to stop it from attacking other cheeses.

It wasn't just the Nac Mac Feegles, but also Wentworth, a strong smell of seaweed, a lot of water and a dead shark.

What are we reading next?

What are you in the mood for? I'm not in the mood for the sequel to Wee Free Men, as it's all "mean girls". Any suggestions?

How 'bout Texas Hero? :P

The Looking-Glass Wars? Lirael? Some Christie?

I don't have the sequel yet, anyway... except in audio form, which tends to be problematic for quotes...

I was thinking of rereading Summers at Castle Auburn, by Sharon Shinn, if I didn't hear from you (And I still might... since I'm not sure where I laid Stardancers down)... But what's The Looking-Glass Wars?

Looking-Glass Wars is Alice in Wonderland set in Victorian London, with Wonderland a sub-London type thing. I think.

Did you look it up on Amazon? They have a pretty good description.

Also, rent Pitch Black before I chew glass! Woman, I swear you were put on this earth to give me fits.

Yup. It's even worse at animal shelters and in Walmarts.

To be fair, though, aren't MOST things worse at Walmarts?

How true.

"Supposing you'd watched the slow accretion of snow over thousands of years as it was compressed and pushed over the deep rock until the glacier calved its icebergs into the sea, and you watched an iceberg drift out through the chilly waters, and you got to know its cargo of happy polar bears and seals as they looked forward to a brave new life in the other hemisphere where they say the ice floes are lined with crunchy penguins, and then wham! Tragedy loomed in the shape of thousands of tons of unaccountably floating iron and an exciting soundtrack.

...you'd want to know the whole story. --TP, ToT

"Genius is always allowed some leeway, once the hammer has been pried from its hands and the blood has been cleaned up." --Ibid

"'Don't you ever let go?'
'I haven't yet.'
'Why?'
'I suppose...because in this world, after everyone panics, there's always got to be someone to tip the wee out of the shoe.'"

--Ibid

... I figured you'd be all about the 'prospect of marriage' quote I took down.

Fun coincidence to see Thud appear here. In a moment I am going to go upstairs and read the last 20 pages. I assume you liked it? I always enjoy books from the "Watch" series, and this one is no exception.

:) I think I might have a small crush on Vimes...

Well, you did sort of marry him.