Plays/Poetry/Essays Read in 2000

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Tags: 
  • "Desire Under the Elms," by Eugene O'Neill
  • "The Orestia," by Aeschylus
  • "Medea," by Euripides
  • "Hippolytus," by Euripides
  • "Callimachus," by Hrotswitha
  • "The Testament of Cresseid," by Robert Henryson
  • "A Book of Showings," by Julian of Norwich (A selection)
  • Poems by Sappho
  • "The Book of Margery Kempe," by Margery Kempe (A selection)
  • "The Fates of Women" Marijane Osborn
  • "Holy Maidenhood," "The Wife's Lament," "The Wanderer," "Wulf and Eadwacer," "The Husband's Message," by Unknown

Wow, you read some of my favorite Greek dramas! I'm curious as to which translations you read, and, of course, whether you enjoyed the plays or not. Hippolytus is especially interesting, I believe, and The Orestia and Medea are wonderful.

Shalom, y'all!

L. Bangs

Apologies for the five month delay in answering this question. I read the Greek dramas as part of a "Women in Early Literature" class. The translation of Aeschylus' Orestia and Euripides' Medea and Hippolytus that I read were translated/edited by David Grene and Richmond Lattimore. I prefer Euripides--Hippolytus is my favorite, too. I plan to put a quote from Hippolytus, "I pray that love may never come to me/with murderous intent/in rhythms measureless and wild," in the introduction of my in-progress fiction novel/thesis.

If you like the Euripides you have read, may I humbly recommend his The Trojan Women? One of my favorite dramas, and certainly one I am a bit surprised wasn't covered in a Women in Early Literature course. I rather like Paul Roche's translation, but many others (including the one in the Lattimore / Grene edited Complete Greek Tragedies) will do.

It is an interesting and daring (for a Greek) take on the aftermath of the Trojan War, with the heroes of the Iliad coming off rather barbaric and the sufferings of the women of Troy dipicting in heart-rending detail. Not an uplifting read, but undeniably powerful and moving.

Shalom, y'all!

L. Bangs

'depicting' Hmmm. Make that 'depicted.'

I'm just reading the Illiad now...you would think that would be the first thing we would have read in "Women in Early Literature." The class was rather lame, but piqued my interested in early Greek literature, so after the Illiad, it's on to the Odyssey, the Aeneid, and then, of course, Ulysses(!) I do like Euripides, though, so thanks--I'll put "The Trojan Women" on my list.