Outstanding Foreign Films

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Tags: 
  • MY BRILLIANT CAREER starring Judy Davis, Sam Nei8ll (1979 Australia)
  • JEAN DE FLORETTE starring Claude Berri, Yves Montand, Gerrard Depardieu, Daniel Auteuil, Elizabeth Depardieu (1986 France)
  • MANON DES SOURCES (aka JEAN DE FLORETTE II) starring Claude Berri, Yves Montand, Emmanuelle Beart, Daniel Auteuil, Elizabeth Depardieu (1986 France)
  • CENTRAL DO BRASIL (CENTRAL STATION) starring Fernanda Montenegro (1998 Brazil)
  • WHALE RIDER starring Keisha Castle-Hughes, Rawiri Paratene (2002 New Zealand/Germany
  • NUOVO CINEMA PARADISO (1988 Italy)
  • FANNY OCH ALEXANDER (aka FANNY AND ALEXANDER)(1982 Sweden)
  • MAP OF THE HUMAN HEART starring Jason Scott Lee (1992 Canada)
  • LA VITA E BELLA (LIFE IS BEAUTIFUL) starring Roberto Benigni, Nicoletta Braschi (1997 Italy)
  • THE FULL MONTY (1997 United Kingdom)
  • MY LEFT FOOT starring Daniel Day-Lewis, Brenda Fricker (1989 Ireland)
  • UNITED 93 starring an incredible cast of nonfamous names too numerous to list (2006 France/UK/US)
  • SMILLA'S SENSE OF SNOW starring Julia Ormond, Vanessa Redgrave, Gabriel Bryne, Richard Harris (1997 Denmark, Germany, Sweden)
  • IL POSTINO starring Philippe Noiret, Massimo Troisi, Maria Grazia Cucinotta (1994 Italy)
  • CROCODILE DUNDEE starring Paul Hogan, Linda Kozlowski (1986 Australia)
  • LOS AMANTES DEL CIRCULO POLAR (LOVERS OF THE ARTIC CIRCLE) starring Najwa Nimri, Fele Martinez (1998 Spain)
  • IL GIARDINA DEI FINZI-CONTINI (THE GARDEN OF THE FINZI-CONTINIS) starring Dominique Sanda, Lino Capolicchio, Helmut Berger (1970 Italy/West Germany)
  • MALENA starring Monica Bellucci, Guiseppe Sulfaro, Luciano Federico, Matilde Piana, Gaetano Aronica (Italy/USA 2000)
  • LA VEUVE DE SAINT-PIERRE starring Juliette Binoche, Daniel Auteuil, Emir Kustruica (Canada/France 2000)
  • THE LUZHIN DEFENCE starring John Tuturro, Emily Watson (UK/France 2000)
  • THE DISH starring Sam Neill, Kevin Harrington, Tom Long I, Patrick Warburton (Australia 2000)
  • MONSOON WEDDING starring Naseeruddin Shah, Lillete Dubey, Shefali Shetty, Vijay Raaz, Tilotama Shome, Vasundhara Das, Ravin Dabas (India/USA/France/Italy 2001)
  • TOGETHER (HE NI ZAI YI QI) starring Yun Tang, Peigi Liu, Long Chen, Zhiwen Wang, Kaige Chen (South Korea/China) (2002)
  • GIRL WITH A PEARL EARRING starring Colin Firth, Scarlett Johansson, Tom Wilkinson (UK/Luxembourg 2003)
  • UN LONG DIMANCHE DE FIANCAILLES (A VERY LONG ENGAGEMENT) starring Audrey Tautou, Gaspard Ulliel (France 2004)
  • VERA DRAKE starring Imelda Staunton, Richard Graham (UK/France/New Zealand 2004)
  • HOTEL RWANDA starring Don Cheadle, Sophie Okonedo (Canada/UK/Italy/South Africa 2004)
  • LADIES IN LAVENDER starring Judi Dench, Maggie Smith, Natascha McElhone, Daniel Bruhl (UK 2004)
  • PRIDE AND PREJUDICE starring Colin Firth, Jennifer Ehl (UK 1995)
  • MRS PALFREY AT THE CLAREMONT starring Joan Plowright, Rupert Friend, Zoe Tapper (UK 2005)
  • WATER starring Lisa Ray, John Abraham, Sarala (Canada/India 2005)
  • PAINTED VEIL starring Naomi Watts, Edward Norton, Liev Schreiber, Toby Jones, Diana Rigg (China/USA 2006)
  • LABERINTO DEL FAUNO, EL (PAN'S LABYRINTH) starring Ivana Baquero, Sergi Lopez, Maribel Verdu (Mexico/Spain/USA 2006)
  • VOLVER starring Penelope Cruz, carmen Maura, Lola Duenas, Blanca Portello (Spain 2006)
  • VENUS starring Peter O'Toole, Jodie Whittaker, Leslie Phillips, Vanessa Redgrave (UK 2006)
  • MISS POTTER starring Renee Zellweger, Ewan McGregor, Emily Watson (UK/US 2006)
  • AWAY FROM HER starring Gordon Pinsent, Julie Christie, Olympia Dukakis (Canada 2006)
  • THE NAMESAKE starring Irfan Khan, Tabu, Kal Penn (India/USA 2006)
  • LA MOME aka LA VIE EN ROSE starring Marion Cotillard, Gerard Depardieu, Jean-Pierre Martins (France/UK/Czech Republic 2007)
  • SE, JIE (LUST, CAUTION) starring Tony Leung Chiu, Wai Wei Tang, Lee-Hom Wang, Joan Chen (USA/China/Taiwan/Hong Kong 2007)
  • ATONEMENT starring James McAvoy, Keira Knightley, Saoirse Ronan, Romola Garai, Vanessa Redgrave (UK/France 2007)
  • JUNO starring Ellen Page, Michael Cera, Allison Janney, J. K. Simmons (USA/Canada/Hungary 2007)
  • FALSCHER, DIE (THE COUNTERFEITERS) starring Karl Markovics, August Diehl, Devid Striesow (Austria/Germany 2007)
  • AUSTRALIA starring Hugh Jackman, Nicole Kidman, Brandon Walters, David Gulpili, David Wenham (Australia/USA 2008)
  • IL Y A LONGTEMPS QUE JE T'AIME (I'VE LONG YOU SO LONG) starring Kristin Scott Thomas, Elsa Zylbeerstein, Serge Hazanvicius, Laurent Grevill (France/Germany 2008)
Author Comments: 

I am a citizen of the U. S. A and I write my lists from the perspective of being an American. The process I go through when I list a movie: I go to http://us.imdb.com/ to look up the exact title, list of actors/actresses, date of release, and country of origin in an attempt to make my lists as accurate as possible. If the movie's country of origin does not list the US first, then I consider it foreign. My definition of foreign is WEBSTER'S NEW WORLD DICTIONARY OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE'S definition, "1. situated outside of one's own country...2.from...another country or countries." In making a distinction between films made in the U. S. A and films made outside of the U. S. A., no offense is intended.

it's so funny because i rarely think of foreign as canadian or UK--but it's true. i guess i go by the old "subtitled or no" division. i loved jean de florette (1&2) and central station--and i'll be taking some of these others as suggestions in the future--thanks!

Julia, 'foreign' is not an absolute concept but a relative one: what's foreign is relative to our nationality, not to our being American. When you write as if we are all American, you insult some of us.

Sure, but "non-American" seems so PC. ;-)

"Foreign" need not be offensive if you consider it as always being relative to the nationality of the speaker (note the "Best Foreign Language Film" Academy Award). All things are relative to their viewpoint. For Julia to equate "foreign" and non-American seems logical (unless she's Bavarian). To take it a step further, I doubt I'd be offended if a French reader created a "Best Foreign Films" list and included a pile of American movies.

Of course, the fact that America exports so much pop culture that "foreign" has universally come to mean "non-American" (in some circles) is a shame. But that's a collective unconscious problem that doesn't scale well to the individual level (an individual saying "foreign" to mean "not of my country" simply exhibits correct usage).

Of course, if the speaker's nationality isn't obvious or cannot be deduced easily, "non-American " (for example) would be more precise.

Jim, I agree fully with what you say in your first paragraph. It says what I said: 'foreign' is relative to one's nationality.

However, have another look at your second paragraph and I'm sure you'll see that your argument there is faulty. There you say that it's a shame that some circles collectively equate 'foreign' with 'non-American'. I agree, but when you scale that equation to the individual level you get an individual's equation of 'foreign' with 'non-American' (a shameful equation), you don't get an equation of 'foreign' with 'not of my country' (a correct equation).

Julia gives the impression that she is making the shameful equation, that's my objection.

I think I see what you mean, but I think I just wasn't being clear. On an individual level, it is a shame if the speaker automatically equates "foreign" with "non-American". Unless, of course, the speaker is American and is using the word properly instead of as a sweeping generalization. And when the speaker is American, it's almost impossible to know if their usage is over-generalized or simply proper, unless you know the speaker really well.

Fact: I am a citizen of the U. S. A and I write my lists from the perspective of being an American. The process I go through when I list a movie: I go to http://us.imdb.com/ to look up the exact title, list of actors/actresses, date of release, and country of origin in an attempt to make my lists as accurate as possible. If the movie's country of origin is not the U. S. A., then I consider it foreign. My definition of foreign is WEBSTER'S NEW WORLD DICTIONARY OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE'S definition, "1. situated outside of one's own country...2.from...another country or countries." In making a distinction between films made in the U. S. A and films made outside of the U. S. A., no offense is intended.

I'm sure you didn't intend any offense, and I'm glad to accept your assurance that my impression of your attitude was mistaken.

So that you don't get the wrong impression of my attitude, let me say this: I have yet to find a more intelligent, literate, and meticulous contributor to The Listology (excepting Jim and myself, of course). Mind you, I don't share your taste in most instances, but, as has long been observed, de gustibus non est disputandum.