The Eleven Best Science Fictions

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Tags: 
  • 1) Blade Runner (1982)
  • 2) 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
  • 3) Metropolis (1927)
  • 4) The Thing (1951)
  • 5) Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977)
  • 6) Alien (1979)
  • 7) The Empire Strikes Back (1980)
  • 8) Terminator 2: Judgement Day (1991)
  • 9) Forbidden Planet (1956)
  • 10) Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956)
  • 11) The Matrix (1999)

Was Brazil considered?

Yes, and is still being considered. I have a very odd relationship with Brazil. I always love the first 3/4s of the film, but there are times the ending completely rubs me the wrong way. On other viewings, it doesn't bother me too much. Ten years ago it would have been near the very top of this list, and with some more thought, it might still wiggle its way on here somewhere.

Great suggestion!

Shalom, y'all!

L. Bangs

I can't for the life of me remember the difference, but have you seen both the theatrical and director's cut endings?

Ah, Invasion of the Body Snatchers. I really loved that film. It surprised me, to tell you thr truth. I didn't expect it to hold my attention the way it did.

I'm very glad you loved it. As a teenager, I found most 50's science fiction pretty cheesy, but Invasion and The Thing were very nice exceptions.

Shalom, y'all!

L. Bangs

Your top six is completely unquestionable, and I like the rest pretty well, too;)

Forbidden Planet is such a great one. In a day when SFX go over the top and overwhelm movies because directors are trying to blow me away with "realistic-looking" shots that rarely do anything but leave me cold, Forbidden Planet is such an oasis. Using the lack of sophisticated effects or sets as a plus, the weirdly and evocatively painted scenes of the planet are just beautiful and spectacular. Just the suggestions these paintings put in my mind carry me away more effectively than the vast majority of films with elaborate effects.

Johnny Waco

Thanks!

Yes, as usual, you've nailed it on the head. Forbidden Planet works partly because its budget led its makers to go for a stylized look rather than a realistic one. As such, it inhabits dreamscapes more than space, and its loose adaptation of The Tempest invades our sleeping world of fantasy and myth instead of our logical world of realism. It is an atmosphere which enhances the film as no amount of CGI special effects looking 'real' (which they rarely do anyway) could ever do.

It is an under-rated film, but its cult is strong and growing. A shame poor Robbie went to Lost in Space afterwards. His career never really recovered...

Shalom, y'all!

L. Bangs

I love Robbie in Forbidden Planet (I just pretend the one in Lost in Space is from the same factory or something)! His deadpan wit (because he's dead!) is out of this universe; when he analyzes the cook's bourbon, and says, "Would 50 gallons (or whatever) be sufficient," ah, well, that just slays me.

Dream-like! That is exactly what I was going for. And I knew it was based on The Tempest, but I didn't even think about linking it to the play's mood of dreams and fantasy...hey, put us two together, and we come up with something approximating intelligence!

Johnny Waco