0017: The Science Fiction Film Hall of Fame (1900-2000)

Tags: 
  • 12 Monkeys (1995)
  • 1984 (1984)
  • 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
  • Aelita, The Queen of Mars (1924)
  • Akira (1987)
  • Alien (1979)
  • Aliens (1986)
  • Alphaville (1965)
  • The Andromeda Strain (1971)
  • The Beast with a Million Eyes (1955)
  • Blade Runner (1982)
  • Brazil (1985)
  • The Bride of Frankenstein (1935)
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971)
  • Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977)
  • Cocoon (1985)
  • Dark City (1998)
  • The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)
  • Death Race 2000 (1975)
  • The Deluge (1933)
  • E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial (1982)
  • Earth Vs. the Flying Saucers (1956)
  • The Empire Strikes Back (1980)
  • Enemy from Space (1957)
  • Escape from New York (1981)
  • The Final Battle (1983)
  • The Fly (1958)
  • The Fly (1986)
  • Forbidden Planet (1956)
  • Frankenstein (1931)
  • Ghost in the Shell (1996)
  • Godzilla (1954)
  • The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957)
  • Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956)
  • The Invisible Man (1933)
  • Island of Lost Souls (1932)
  • It Came From Outer Space (1953)
  • It Happened Here (1965)
  • La Jetee (1962)
  • Jurassic Park (1993)
  • King Kong (1933)
  • The Lost World (1925)
  • Mad Max (1979)
  • The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976)
  • The Matrix (1999)
  • Metropolis (1927)
  • Not of This Earth (1976)
  • The Omega Man (1971)
  • On the Beach (1959)
  • Planet of the Apes (1968)
  • Return of the Jedi (1983)
  • The Road Warrior (1981)
  • Robocop (1987)
  • Scanners (1981)
  • Seconds (1966)
  • Shivers (1975)
  • Slaughterhouse Five (1972)
  • Solaris (1972)
  • Stalker (1979)
  • Star Trek II: The Wrath of Kahn (1982)
  • Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986)
  • Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991)
  • Star Wars (1977)
  • Starman (1984)
  • Superman: The Movie (1978)
  • Superman II (1980)
  • The Terminator (1984)
  • Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991)
  • Them! (1954)
  • The Thing (1951)
  • The Thing (1982)
  • Things to Come (1936)
  • The Time Machine (1960)
  • The Venus Wars (1989)
  • Videodrome (1982)
  • Voyage to the Moon (1902)
  • Westworld (1973)
  • When Worlds Collide (1951)

This list begs another list: The Science Fiction Hall of Ought to be Famous, containing (off the top of my head) MIRACLE MILE, for one.

Hey, Bertie! Great to hear from you.

I have seen Miracle Mile, and while I enjoyed it, I just couldn't quite bring myself to allow it into the hall of fame. I'm not sure it fits the definition of 'science fiction' closely enough to be let in. Nuclear holocaust is certainly an interesting subject (especially with a bit of satire a la Miracle Mile or Dr. Strangelove), but I decided against including them here. Forgive me.

Shalom, y'all!

L. Bangs

Of course you couldn't include it: it's not famous. But I'm pleased to see you have included one of my very favorite guilty sf pleasures THE OMEGA MAN. I belive there is a remake in the works, under the title of the novel: I AM LEGEND (author: Richard Matheson). Actually TOM is itself a remake, the novel having been filmed before as (I think) THE LAST MAN starring...wait for it...Vincent Price.

Very interesting. I had no idea another version of OM exists or that a new one is in development. Have you seen The Last Man? Would you advise anybody else to?

Shalom, y'all!

L. Bangs

No, never seen it, and from what I've read of it it isn't worth seeking out, although, if I switched on the tv and it was on I'd watch it. (Boswell to Johnson: Was not Fingal's Cave worth seeing? Johnson to Boswell: Worth seeing, yes, but not worth going to see.)

Thank you for including the vintage King Kong and the Harryhausens, as well as several other classics from more than 15 years ago. Cultural memory is drastically reduced, even in genre entertainment. It's nice to see someone appreciate standouts from Melies onward.

I greatly appreciate this comment. I took especial pains to try to include great science fiction films from throughout the entire history of cinema, and your comments make that work worth it. King Kong is a much discussed yet oddly little-seen classic that deserves more viewing (and a DVD release!). Harryhausen should never be forgotten; he raised primitive special effects to an odd realm of poetry. If I ever get around to a similar fantasy list, you can be sure to see his work appear again. As for the Meilies, how could I exclude him? Very likely ground zero for science fiction, and while the piece is short, I believe it is still extremely enjoyable today.

Again, thanks for the kind words.

Shalom, y'all!

L. Bangs

I was wondering why Fantastic Voyage wasn't on the list.

If you won't shoot me, I'll admit that I don't really care that much for Fantastic Voyage, nor do I believe its influence demands it a place on the list.

If, however, you would shoot me, I simply claim I forgot about the film and will add it whenever I get around to updating this list... ;)

Sorry!

Shalom, y'all!

L. Bangs

What about "Silent Running" from 71'?

Lets try again. What about Silent Running from '71?

Sorry, J. Just now noticed your query.

Silent Running, though quite a cult film, doesn't make the cut here. It has a fairly small but avid cult, and Trumbull is essential to the history of science fiction films, but the film is rather dated and dilluted by an over-simple story and hippy pandering (though, no doubt, very heart-felt pandering). Great effects from the true S/F master, though.

So I find its quality a bit lacking and its historical importance not quite powerful enough to make the list from sheer influence.

Shalom, y'all!

L. Bangs

Let's get this list going again (it's only been three years since it was posted on!). Would you consider the original of The Lost World (1925) for this list? It's one I never get tired of, and, along with Metropolis , has to be one of the two best sci-fi movies from the silent era.

And I'm still waiting for King Kong on DVD. Grrr...

Johnny Waco

At first, I thought it was closer to a fantasy than a science fiction film, but since King Kong is on the list, I guess that's a bit silly, eh?

I hear the King Kong DVD is in the works and is supposedly loaded with goodies! I can not wait either!

Shalom, y'all!

L. Bangs

I just saw George Pal's 1960 The Time Machine for the first time this last week and loved it! There's something about the Victorian settings and primitive (yet effective) special effects that put it miles ahead of the recent Guy Pierce version. There is also a pretty cool documentary from the late eighties or early nineties on the DVD hosted by Rod Taylor; my favorite part is when he shows some of the many models of the time machine that flooded the studio after the movie came out. One was by a guy (still in high school at the time) who would be a set designer for the original Star Trek series. Neat stuff...

Johnny Waco

It sounds like I'll have to rent that DVD just to see the documentary!

Odd you mention this. The on-campus college movie channel run by the university has just started showing both the 60s' Time Machine and the more recent one as a double feature! I love the original, but can't seem to sit through the boring new one...

And the new special effects can't touch the classic!

Shalom, y'all!

L. Bangs

I've been in a Sci-Fi mood lately, which explains why I keep impulsively commenting on this list. A couple of questions for you: what is your opinion of Carpenter's The Thing? I think it is one of his better three or four movies, and it does a great job with the Polar location. A real sense of dreead creeps in. And to me, it comes off as more than just a cheap remake of the fifties version.

What is your feeling about the upcoming Will Smith vehicle I Robot? I haven't seen a preview, but I have to wonder if this is going to be a hatchet job; Asimov's book is enjoyable, but has little drama in it that seems translatable to the screen.

Johnny Waco

Looking back at this post, I realize I haven't seen I, Robot even though it is now out on DVD, but from the previews, it seemed it had nothing to do with Asimov's book. My question would be: why even option the book, or pay for the rights if there is nothing in common? Or if it went off in a completely different direction, why keep the title? It's probably all for the best because I still stand by my earlier post that the book has little potential for compelling drama.

And by the way, whay about Carpenter's The Thing?

Johnny Waco

How about A.I, Mars Attacks, Twelve Monkeys, The Matrix, and Stalker.

Stalker should be up there; I'm not sure how I missed it. Same probably goes for 12 Monkeys.

The Matrix missed the cut-off date, but is certainly worthy. I don't believe I have caught the others yet. I'll have to investigate; this is not the first prodding I have had towards A.I.!

Shalom, y'all!

L. Bangs

Alright, finally updated. Comments welcomed, as always.

Now about that horror list...

Shalom, y'all!

L. Bangs

Nice! Have you seen Gattaca?

Thanks!

I have seen it; I would probably rate it a ** 1/2 or a ***. I'm not sure if it hits my criteria for the above list, but I liked it.

Shalom, y'all!

L. Bangs

Even if you have reservations, I'm happy to hear you didn't dislike it. I recall that movie arriving DOA at the box office, and to ho-hums from the critics. I could never figure that out. I was quite taken with it, although it's been awhile so I'd have to see it again to reaffirm my faith.