Greatest Films - Extended List

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  1. 9.4/10
  2. Citizen Kane-Welles (1941)
  3. Metropolis-Lang (1927) ["The Complete Metropolis", 147 minutes]
  4. Underground-Kusturica (1995)
  5. Brazil-Gilliam (1985) [The Final Cut, 142 minutes]

  6. 9.3/10
  7. Nostalghia-Tarkovsky (1983)
  8. Lost Highway-Lynch (1997)

  9. 9.2/10
  10. Touch of Evil-Welles (1958) [Restored Welles' Cut, 108 minutes]

  11. 9.1/10
  12. The Kingdom-Von Trier (1994)
  13. Nashville-Altman (1975)
  14. The Wild Bunch-Peckinpah (1969) [Director's Cut, 145 minutes]
  15. Mirror-Tarkovsky (1974)

  16. 9.0/10
  17. Persona-Bergman (1966)
  18. Possession-Zulawski (1981) [Original Cut, 123 minutes]
  19. The Passion of Joan of Arc-Dreyer (1927)

  20. 8.9/10
  21. Ikiru-Kurosawa (1952)
  22. Hush...Hush Sweet Charlotte-Aldrich (1965)
  23. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia-Peckinpah (1974)

  24. 8.8/10
  25. Vertigo - Alfred Hitchcock (1958)
  26. The Sacrifice-Tarkovsky (1986)
  27. Blade Runner-Scott (1982) [The Final Cut, 117 minutes]
  28. La Dolce Vita-Fellini (1960)
  29. The Godfather-Coppola (1972)
  30. Natural Born Killers-Stone (1994) [Director's Cut, 123 minutes]
  31. Taxi Driver-Scorsese (1976)
  32. Funny Games-Haneke (1997)
  33. The Killer-Woo (1989)
  34. The Cook, The Thief, His Wife & Her Lover-Greenaway (1989)
  35. Raiders of the Lost Ark-Spielberg (1981)
  36. Ran-Kurosawa (1985)

  37. [POSSIBLY 8.8/10+ AND MINIMALLY 8.3/10, BUT NEED TO REVISIT: Greed-Von Stroheim (1924) [Studio Cut, 140 minutes]; L'Age D'Or-Bunuel (1930); North By Northwest-Hitchcock (1959); What Ever Happened To Baby Jane?-Aldrich (1962); Marnie-Hitchcock (1964); 2001: A Space Odyssey-Kubrick (1968); The Traveling Players-Angelopoulos (1975); Landscape in the Mist-Angelopoulos (1988); The Color of Paradise-Majidi (1998); Inland Empire-Lynch (2006)

  38. 8.7/10
  39. Battleship Potemkin-Eisenstein (1925) [Fully Restored 2007 Kino Version]
  40. City of Lost Children-Jeunet (1995)

  41. 8.6/10
  42. On the Waterfront-Kazan (1954)
  43. Apocalypse Now-Coppola (1979) [Original Theatrical Release, 153 minutes]
  44. Miracle in Milan-De Sica (1951)
  45. The Man With A Movie Camera-Vertov (1928)

  46. 8.5/10
  47. Stalker-Tarkovsky (1979)
  48. Cries & Whispers-Bergman (1973)
  49. Belle de Jour-Bunuel (1967)
  50. 8 1/2-Fellini (1963)
  51. Chinatown-Polanski (1974)
  52. Earth-Dovzhenko (1930)
  53. Satantango-Tarr (1994)
  54. Pulp Fiction-Tarantino (1994)
  55. Wings of Desire-Wenders (1987)
  56. The Ballad of Narayama-Imamura (1983)

  57. 8.4/10
  58. The Magnificent Ambersons-Welles (1942)
  59. The Lady from Shanghai-Welles (1948)
  60. Zardoz-Boorman (1972)
  61. Andrei Rublev-Tarkovsky (1966)
  62. Mr. Arkadin-Welles (1955) [The Comprehensive Version, 105 minutes]
  63. 12 Monkeys-Gilliam (1995)
  64. Dr. Akagi-Imamura (1998)
  65. Raging Bull-Scorsese (1980)
  66. Sunrise-Murnau (1927)
  67. Face/Off-Woo (1997)
  68. LA Confidential-Hanson (1998)
  69. Grand Illusion-Renoir (1937)
  70. Europa-Von Trier (1991)
  71. The Godfather, Part 2-Coppola (1974)
  72. Secret Ceremony-Losey (1968)
  73. Werckmeister Harmonies-Tarr (2000)

  74. 8.3/10
  75. The Birds-Hitchcock (1963)
  76. Blue Velvet-Lynch (1986)
  77. Blow Up-Antonioni (1966)
  78. Shock Corridor-Fuller (1963)
  79. Point Blank-Boorman (1967)
  80. Limelight-Chaplin (1952)
  81. The Phantom Carriage-Sjostrom (1921)
  82. The Circus-Chaplin (1928)
  83. Weekend-Godard (1967)
  84. Black Cat, White Cat-Kusturica (1998)
  85. Once Upon A Time In The West-Leone (1968)
  86. Children of Paradise-Carne (1945)
  87. Viridiana-Bunuel (1961)
  88. The Deer Hunter-Cimino (1978)
  89. La Strada-Fellini (1954)
  90. Eternity and a Day-Angelopoulos (1998)
  91. The Seventh Seal-Bergman (1957)
  92. Wild Strawberries-Bergman (1957)
  93. The Terminator-Cameron (1984)

  94. 8.2/10
  95. The Last Laugh-Murnau (1924)
  96. A Face in the Crowd-Kazan (1957)
  97. Reservoir Dogs-Tarantino (1992)
  98. Leon: The Professional-Besson (1994)
  99. Close Encounters of the Third Kind-Spielberg (1977)
  100. The Seven Samurai-Kurosawa (1954)
  101. To Be or Not To Be-Lubitsch (1947)
  102. Why Has Bodhi-Dharma Left for the East?-Yong-kyun (1989)

  103. 8.1/10
  104. It's a Wonderful Life-Capra (1946)
  105. Hard Boiled-Woo (1992)
  106. Dressed To Kill-De Palma (1980)
  107. Splendor in the Grass-Kazan (1961)
  108. The Road Warrior-Miller (1981)
  109. The General-Keaton (1926)
  110. The Blue Angel-Von Sternberg (1930)
  111. M - Lang (1931)
  112. Mean Streets-Scorsese (1973)
  113. Dead Man-Jarmusch (1995)
  114. Sansho the Bailiff-Mizoguchi (1954)
  115. Othello - Welles (1952)
  116. The Pillow Book-Greenaway (1996)
  117. Repulsion-Polanski (1965)

  118. 8.0/10
  119. Leaving Las Vegas-Figgis (1995)
  120. Red-Kieslowski (1994)
  121. Memento-Nolan (2001)
  122. After Hours-Scorsese (1985)
  123. Shallow Grave - Boyle (1994)
  124. Rashomon-Kurosawa (1950)
  125. Psycho-Hitchcock (1960)
  126. Dirty Harry-Siegel (1971)
  127. Silence of the Lambs-Demme (1991)
  128. Hero-Yimou (2002)
  129. Bonnie & Clyde-Penn (1967)

  130. 7.9/10
  131. The Conversation-Coppola (1974)
  132. Last Tango in Paris-Bertolucci (1972)
  133. Time-Ki-duk (2006)
  134. Old Boy-Chan-wook (2003)
  135. Body Double-De Palma (1984)
  136. Scarface-Hawks (1932)
  137. The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari-Wiene (1920)
  138. High Noon-Zimmerman (1952)
  139. The Scarlet Empress-Von Sternberg (1934)


  140. 7.8/10 - 8.2/10 [NOT IN ORDER YET]
  141. Birth of a Nation-Griffith (1915)
  142. Intolerance-Griffith (1916)
  143. Ulysses' Gaze-Angelopoulos (1995)
  144. Aliens-Cameron (1986) [Theatrical Cut, 137 minutes]
  145. A Clockwork Orange-Kubrick (1971)
  146. After Life-Kore-eda (1998)
  147. Maborosi-Kore-eda (1995)
  148. Bringing Up Baby-Hawks (1938)
  149. His Girl Friday-Hawks (1940)
  150. Invasion of the Body Snatchers-Siegel (1956)
  151. Jules & Jim-Truffaut (1961)
  152. The Big Sleep-Hawks (1946)
  153. Play Time-Tati (1967)
  154. The Holy Mountain-Jodorowsky (1973)
  155. The Great Dictator-Chaplin (1940)
  156. Sunset Boulevard-Wilder (1950)
  157. La Femme Nikita-Besson (1990)
  158. Wild at Heart-Lynch (1990)
  159. Hiroshima, Mon Amour-Resnais (1959)
  160. Ordet-Dreyer (1955)
  161. Delicatessen-Jeunet (1991)
  162. Das Boot-Petersen (1981)
  163. Naked-Leigh (1993)
  164. Come & See-Klimov (1985)
  165. Duel-Spielberg (1971)
  166. Pi-Aronofsky (1998)
  167. King of New York-Ferrara (1990)
  168. Being John Malkovich-Jonze (1999)
  169. Network-Lumet (1976)
  170. Alien-Scott (1979)
  171. Rosemary's Baby-Polanski (1968)
  172. Some Like it Hot-Wilder (1959)
  173. The Ballad of Cable Hogue-Peckinpah (1970)
  174. Cache-Haneke (2005)
  175. The Apartment-Wilder (1960)
  176. 21 Grams-Inarritu (2003)
  177. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind-Gondry (2004)
  178. Star Wars-Lucas (1977)
  179. Faust-Murnau (1926)
  180. Dogma-Smith (1999)
  181. Funny Bones-Chelsom (1995)
  182. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre-Huston (1948)
  183. Once Were Warriors-Tamahori (1994)
  184. The Willow Tree-Majidi (2005)
  185. Mr. Smith Goes To Washington-Capra (1939)
  186. Deliverance-Boorman (1972)
  187. The Rules of the Game-Renoir (1939)
  188. Mad Max-Miller (1980)
  189. Amateur-Hartley (1994)
  190. The Manchurian Candidate-Frankenheimer (1962)
  191. Petulia-Lester (1968)
  192. The Red Shoes-Powell/Pressburger (1948)
  193. The French Connection-Friedkin (1971)
  194. Black Rain-Imamura (1989)
  195. If...-Anderson (1968)
  196. The Exorcist-Friedkin (1973)
  197. Schindler's List-Spielberg (1993)
  198. Rear Window-Hitchcock (1954)
  199. Vampyr-Dreyer (1931)
  200. Meshes of the Afternoon-Deren (1943)
  201. The Exterminating Angel-Bunuel (1962)
  202. Last Year at Marienbad-Resnais (1961)
  203. Dr. Strangelove-Kubrick (1964)
  204. The King of Comedy-Scorsese (1983)
  205. Something Wild-Demme (1986)
  206. Airplane-Zucker (1980)
  207. A Fish Called Wanda-Crichton (1988)
  208. City Lights-Chaplin (1931)
  209. Soylent Green-Fleischer (1973)
  210. King Kong-Schoedsack (1933)
  211. Blow Out-De Palma (1981)
  212. Breaking the Waves-Von Trier (1996)
  213. Walkabout-Roeg (1971)
  214. Night of the Living Dead-Romero (1968)
  215. The Game-Fincher (1998)
  216. Fatal Attraction-Lyne (1987)
  217. One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest-Forman (1975)
  218. Peeping Tom-Powell (1960)
  219. The Last Picture Show-Bogdanovich (1971)
  220. The Sweet Hereafter-Egoyan (1998)
  221. Strange Days-Bigelow (1995)
  222. The 39 Steps-Hitchcock (1935)
  223. Raising Arizona-Coen (1987)
  224. The Truman Show-Weir (1998)
  225. The Graduate-Nichols (1967)
  226. Miller's Crossing-Coen (1990)
  227. Trainspotting-Boyle (1996)
  228. The Fifth Element-Besson (1996)

  229. 7.7/10
  230. Mulholland Drive-Lynch (2001)
  231. Videodrome-Cronenberg (1983)
  232. Fargo-Coen (1996)
  233. McCabe & Mrs. Miller-Altman (1971)
  234. Belly of an Architect-Greenaway (1987)
  235. The Duchess of Langeais-Rivette (2007)
  236. Goodfellas-Scorsese (1990)
  237. Modern Times-Chaplin (1936)
  238. Jaws-Spielberg (1975)
  239. Woman Under The Influence-Cassavetes (1974)

  240. 7.6/10
  241. Texas Chainsaw Massacre-Hooper (1974)
  242. Synecdoche, New York-Kaufman (2008)
  243. The Getaway-Peckinpah (1972)
  244. Pepe Le Moko-Duvivier (1937)
  245. Frantic-Polanski (1988)
  246. The Tree of Life-Malick (2011)
  247. The Conformist-Bertolucci (1971)
  248. Insignificance-Roeg (1985)
  249. The Third Man-Reed (1949)
  250. Blue-Kieslowski (1993)
  251. The Searchers-Ford (1956)
  252. Under the Skin - Jonathan Glazer (2014)
  253. Simon of the Desert - Bunuel (1965)

  254. 7.5/10
  255. The Shining-Kubrick (1980)
  256. The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance-Ford (1962)
  257. American Beauty-Mendes (1999)
  258. Prefab People-Tarr (1987)
  259. Platoon-Stone (1986)
  260. To Catch a Thief-Hitchcock (1955)
  261. Zero for Conduct-Vigo (1933)
  262. Late Spring-Ozu (1949)
  263. Un Chien Andalou-Bunuel (1928)
  264. The Magician-Bergman (1958)
  265. Sullivan's Travels-Sturges (1941)
  266. All About Eve-Mankiewicz (1950)
  267. The Big Heat-Lang (1953)
  268. Kiss Me Deadly-Aldrich (1955)
  269. Blood Simple - Coen (1984)
  270. Notorious-Hitchcock (1946)
  271. The Andromeda Strain-Wise (1971)
  272. Escape from Alcatraz-Siegel (1979)
  273. Amores Perros-Inarritu (2000)
  274. Stagecoach-Ford (1939)
  275. The Empire Strikes Back-Kershner (1980)
  276. There Will Be Blood-Anderson (2007)
  277. Shame-Bergman (1968)
  278. The Thin Red Line-Malick (1998)
  279. The Trial-Welles (1962)
  280. Paris, Texas-Wenders (1983)
  281. Tokyo Story-Ozu (1953)
  282. Broken Blossoms-Griffith (1919)
  283. Pather Panchali-Ray (1955)
  284. Don't Look Now-Roeg (1973)
  285. Duck Soup-McCarey/The Marx Brothers (1933)
  286. The Seventh Continent-Haneke (1989)
  287. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter and Spring-Ki-duk (2003)
  288. Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors - Parajanov (1964)

  289. 7.4/10
  290. Southland Tales-Kelly (2005)
  291. The Science of Sleep-Gondry (2006)
  292. The Beat That My Heart Skipped-Audiard (2005)
  293. Ugetsu Monogatari-Mizoguchi (1953)
  294. The Piano-Campion (1993)
  295. Days of Heaven-Malick (1978)
  296. Amelie-Jeunet (2001)
  297. Magnolia-Anderson (1999)
  298. Forrest Gump-Zemeckis (1994)
  299. Fanny & Alexander-Bergman (1982)
  300. All Quiet on the Western Front-Milestone (1930)
  301. Cat Ballou-Silverstein (1965)
  302. Alexander Nevsky-Eisenstein (1938)
  303. The Crowd-Vidor (1928)
  304. Giant-Stevens (1955)
  305. Taxidermia-Palfi (2006)
  306. Double Indemnity-Wilder (1944)
  307. The Killing-Kubrick (1956)
  308. Monty Python and the Holy Grail-Gilliam (1975)
  309. Spellbound-Hitchcock (1945)
  310. The Untouchables-De Palma (1987)
  311. Au Hasard Balthazar-Bresson (1966)
  312. Manhattan-Allen (1979)
  313. Life is Beautiful-Benigni (1997)
  314. Badlands-Malick (1973)
  315. The Lives of Others-Donnersmarck (2007)
  316. The Bride of Frankenstein-Whale (1935)
  317. Ivan's Childhood-Tarkovsky (1962)
  318. Chungking Express-Kar Wai (1994)
  319. Exotica - Egoyan (1994)
  320. Breathless-Godard (1959)
  321. Shadows-Cassavetes (1959)
  322. Solaris-Tarkovsky (1971)
  323. Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives-Weerasethakul (2010)

  324. 7.3/10
  325. 2046-Kar Wai (2004)
  326. Dogville-Von Trier (2003)
  327. Chimes at Midnight-Welles (1966)
  328. Smiles of a Summer Night-Bergman (1955)
  329. Adaptation-Jonze (2002)
  330. Waltz With Bashir-Folman (2008)
  331. Cabaret-Fosse (1972)
  332. The Eel-Imamura (1997)
  333. Yeelen-Cisse (1987)
  334. Aguirre, the Wrath of God-Herzog (1972)
  335. The African Queen-Huston (1951)
  336. Paths of Glory-Kubrick (1957)
  337. Black Narcissus-Powell (1947)
  338. The Usual Suspects-Singer (1995)
  339. All About My Mother-Almodovar (1999)
  340. Thelma & Louise-Scott (1991)
  341. Shane-Stevens (1953)
  342. Melancholia-Von Trier (2011)
  343. No Country For Old Men-Coen (2007)
  344. Secrets & Lies-Leigh (1996)
  345. Requiem For A Dream-Aronofsky (2000)
  346. The White Ribbon-Haneke (2009)
  347. Grave of the Fireflies-Takahata (1988)
  348. Europa Europa-Holland (1990)
  349. The Virgin Spring-Bergman (1961)
  350. Eyes Wide Shut-Kubrick (1999)
  351. Working Girl-Nichols (1988)
  352. Midnight Cowboy-Schlesinger (1969)
  353. The Outlaw and His Wife-Sjostrom (1917)
  354. Heat-Mann (1995)
  355. Back To The Future-Zemeckis (1985)
  356. Annie Hall-Allen (1977)
  357. La Jetee-Marker (1962)
  358. Children of Men-Cuaron (2006)
  359. Planet of the Apes-Schaffner (1968)
  360. The Draughtman's Contract-Greenaway (1982)
  361. Witness-Weir (1985)
  362. Laura-Preminger (1944)
  363. To Die For-Van Sant (1995)
  364. Full Metal Jacket-Kubrick (1987)
  365. Pierrot le Fou-Godard (1965)
  366. Freaks-Browning (1932)
  367. Who Framed Roger Rabbit?-Zemeckis (1988)
  368. Beetlejuice-Burton (1988)
  369. Wayne's World-Spheeris (1992)
  370. The Shanghai Gesture-Von Sternberg (1941)
  371. Rebecca-Hitchcock (1940)
  372. World on a Wire-Fassbinder (1973)
  373. L'Atalante-Vigo (1934)
  374. Bicycle Thieves-DeSica (1948)
  375. Winter Light-Bergman (1962)
  376. The Day the Earth Stood Still-Wise (1951)

hello, how do you make that yellow strip through your list?

Add the plus symbol before the line you want to highlight. You may need to add an underline symbol just following the "plus", depending on the type of list you're creating.

Notes: this will sooner or later be rectified (I am rewatching tons of films as well as a steady flow of new ones), but currently this list is most accurate from the top down. In other words, the higher you go the more accurate the list becomes. This is mainly because, usually, I've watched those ones several times more than the lower ones, so am more certain of their exact rating and position. This is also why there's been so much change recently with the 7.3's and at other various points.

Also, it is a good estimate that there will sooner or later be several more films in the 7.9-8.7 range than there are now, whether through new discoveries ranking there, or by rewatching and upgrading films already ranked.

Holy shitfuckdamn this is exact!

Yep ( :

I'm getting increasingly sensitive to the nuances that separate the films overall rating, point to miniscule point.

This works for a single authored list like this, which I like more than lumping a bunch of stuff together (ahem...). I still think Pitchfork.com is stupid for using it with 100's of authors. And...Brazil!!! I love it, but wow! I can't remember how great Possession was, only how crazy it got as it progressed. I still don't understand the greatness behind NBK or Blow-Up, but I have Mallrats and Dazed and Confused up as high. It's nice to see Color of paradise high too. End slightly random transmission of thoughts.

I too agree that a personalized list is usually better than the lumped together lists, particularly if a certain criteria is followed and stuck with throughout - then there's some more sense and organization behind it and it's easier to relate to (even at points of disagreement).

Pretty much anything I have to say on NBK is covered in my "Guide to Greatest Films" review. Possession is unbelievable. I have it on order to see again soon, and hopefully after that, I'll write a review. Blow Up too, perhaps soon? I hope... it's definitely one of the more difficult ones to analyze/explain...

I am intrigued by your high rating of Natural Born Killers. What qualities of it impress you? I hear lots of negative reviews, so I never checked it out.

EDIT: Now that I've watched it to see, I am really, really impressed by it as a visceral experience. I feel that one or two more watches might be necessary to really absorb what it's trying to get across (beyond the obvious major theme of media exploitation of violence). I would love to hear your take on it, though.

First off, make sure it's the Director's Cut if you haven't already, which in particular elevates the apocalyptic finale in the prison to a whole new level.

Natural Born Killers is one of the most astonishing visual experiences in cinema: a surreal, apocalyptic nightmare which in itself is not only a damning, excessive (but accurate) depiction of the media hordes, but even more importantly from an emotional perspective is that the entire film is a terrifying state of mind; a forced, frenzied plunge into the horrifying inner world & psychotic state of its characters--virtually every shot/sequence is psychotically altered to depict violent, surreal, mercurial changes in the varying mental states of its protagonists. It accomplishes this not only by its visual state but also through the constant influx of sequencing & shots through the maniacal editing, which takes Eisensteinian montage from Battleship Potemkin to the extreme.

Natural Born Killers could be likened to the album Nail by Foetus. I highly recommend listening to "album equivalents" as companion pieces while going throug the best films (and vice versa, while going through the best albums). See my "Greatest Films & Their Album Equivalents" list if you haven't already.

Just wanted to say how much I appreciate the suggestions I've taken from this list so far. Just finished The Kingdom (just the first four episodes) today. What a devastating work! Just massive, and the editing style creates such a confused, exciting sense of space. Dizzying in the best ways, but also with a great sense of humor and a good amount of scares. Do you recommend the second part, as well?

Thanks ( : Its combination of (very black) comedy, horror, ensemble drama, satire, etc is indeed overwhelming... You know, for some reason I haven't seen the 2nd series yet. If you do, please let me know how it is.

AfterHours, you might like Criticker. They have a 100 point rating scale for movies _and_ it does an incredibly accurate job of predicting future scores on movies.

Thanks, you're right: it is a very good site and it did a better job than I would've expected with its score predictions.

Woah, great list. How old might you be?

Thanks :) 32

You're welcome. I also love 2001, Citizen Kane, and others. Have you seen House, the 1977 Japanese film?

Woah, that's old.

Yea, it's completely absurd and nonsensical. Amazing visuals and editing.

Agree with you there.

Many thanks for the great list! It, certainly, will help to orient for fans of cinema in the ocean of the cinema production. But, as it seems to me, this list reflects purely a subjective view. And there is also another, may be alternative, may be fuller and, the most important thing, more objective list (The Top 1000 Movies of all time) at FilmGourmand.In the same place, on this site, objective criteria of inclusion of films into the list of the best movies are specified.

Why is an objective list "the most important thing"?

All is very simple. The lists published in a network or somewhere else, serve as a certain reference point for the people who are doing not wish and not having possibility to spend the personal time for watching all films for defining, which films are worthy for appreciation and which are not. Therefore, having a respect for such people, and, in my opinion, there are majority of them, it is necessary to give as much as possible objective information, instead of to show the subjective view. As simple as that.

Thank you

NOTE: At this point in time, this list is quite a bit more accurate from 7.8 on up than from 7.3 - 7.7 (some 7.3's or 7.4's could really be 7.4's and 7.5's, a handful of 7.5's - 7.7's could be 7.8+, etc...). I am going to be discovering the remaining 7.3's - 7.7's (probably a minimum of 100 more) so now that portion of the list will gradually fill out and get more solidified. Also, I estimate there are at least 30 more 7.8+ to find (or upgrade from the 7.3 - 7.7 range), and possibly some more 8.5's, and I'm also holding out hope that I'll find a few more 9's, so I'll be filling out those echelons simultaneously as needed.

Such an amazing list. The best I've ever seen. I have been watching all the films on it.

Thanks, it will be fun to watch your own list expand. It already has so many amazing films on it :-)

What about Se7en? I personally found it much better than Silence of the Lambs (the other cult film in this category). It should be at least a 8/10 (if not a 9/10) :)

Yes, they do share similarities don't they? Really, I'd have to see it again. It's been years but I remember it being, pardon the pun, a 7 - though, again, it's been at least 7-8 years since I saw it.

Ahahahahaha......

Oh God, so many 7s.

The Shawshank Redemption, The Green Mile. What do you think of this Stephen King - Frank Darabont masterpieces?

I think they're both solid, affecting films. I'd rate them 6, 6.5-ish, but obviously plenty of people would disagree with me and say they're two of the greatest films ever (particularly Shawshank Redemption).

As a film, The Green Mile was the biggest surprise for me. I've never thought this kind of film would enter my top 20. Maybe it's not a perfect film, but I think it's the most emotional film of all time, above everything else.

Whoops, missed this comment! I remember it being emotional too. I'd say the most emotionally moving "Hollywood" film of all time is probably Schindler's List. Another one I'd rank highly that is in a style that influenced Spielberg/Hollywood filmmaking, is Kurosawa's Ikiru. Overall, I'd probably rank Tarkovsky's Nostalghia, Angelopoulos' Traveling Players, Landscape in the Mist, and perhaps Zulawksi's Possession at or near the top. Possession is so catastrophically, ferociously devastating. And Landscape in the Mist, Traveling Players and Nostalghia are so emotionally moving in such amazingly profound ways that the effect, combined with such awe, is "reverberating" and overwhelming.

Another question: I'd say all your top picks (9.0's and above) are in my top 100, or close. They're very original, profound, well-directed, emotionally moving films. But there's one pick I don't understand: North By Northwest. Of course, it's an essential piece of entertaining cinema, I respect it very much. But it's really better than Mirror, Persona or Underground etc.? Vertigo and Psycho (and maybe Rear Window) are more profound, complex, and significant. On the other side of the coin, North by Nortwest perhaps one of the most entertaining film of the era, and very dynamic. However, this list doesn't contain this kind of films (except Aliens) in the top 100. Considering your taste in cinema, seems illogical to me (like mine's pick The Green Mile considering my taste) Of course, I would'nt like to mean that you are wrong about this rating, but I'm curious why you rank this so high.

North by Northwest is possibly the most misunderstood choice of my 9/10's and yours is a question that gets asked from time to time. I do plan on writing a review of the film on my "Guide to Greatest Films" list which will explain why in detail. There is MUCH more than initially meets the eye with North by Northwest, and it is indeed one of the most astonishing, powerful films ever made. Each climax of the film is a collision of several themes/genres volcanically merging and each is a life-changing/character-altering experience for the protagonist. Every thing in the film is suspenseful, from the plot, to each conversation. Each theme is met with several dichotomies during the action: suspenseful and death-defying while being screwball comedy and hilarious, etc. The entire film adds up to a relentless overhaul of the main character, whereupon a life he denies is forced on him unwittingly and he eventually becomes a person who didn't exist. Throughout the majority of the film he is left defenseless as this happens in each episode, but by the end he is anarchic towards both sides and has grown into a self-determined individual who takes control of his own fate regardless of either side. All of this takes place in scenes of grave danger, ridiculous irony and gloriously vivid spectacle. Lastly, even though all this is in plain sight and right there to experience, Hitchcock "hides" it in the breeziness and "entertainment" of the film, in an act of defiance to the audience/critics (who at the time had dismissed Vertigo) - a grand joke on them who don't realize the depth and power of what they are watching (no offense to you or anyone else - it took me several viewings to see this).

Damn, I've hardly had time to talk (type) about it, but it has been so friggin' amazing discovering (and rediscovering) all these films. Just looking through this list often brings goosebumps and makes me want to rewatch any film on here that I haven't seen recently! And here I thought I'd actually make the time to start going through music (particularly classical) again... More than likely I will get back into music at a later time. The way things are going, there's probably still another 100+ movies to add in the 7.3+ range. Yes, I know I said the same thing some 70-odd additions ago, hence the plus symbol :)

City Lights is too low!

I might agree. I do need to watch it again. I could see it being as high as a 7.6 or 7.7 maybe :)

I think it's a great movie, but only that, until the ending, one of the best ever. That would be a good list, without spoilers, what would be your top endings of movies?

Depends on how you define “ending”. Is it the last shot, the last few scenes, or the last full sequence? You can make the case that the entire Kurtz compound sequence is Apocalypse Now’s “ending” or the entire last 30-ish minutes of 2001: A Space Odyssey is its “ending”, or the last 1/2 of Nostalghia, or the entire last hour-ish (“Furioso”) of Metropolis. If we’re talking “short” endings (approx 15 min or less?), then these could be the best imo, in possibly the following order:

-2001: A Space Odyssey (Aftermath of Dave’s landing: advancing through subconscious [after]lifetime inside “cosmic bedroom” + final shot of star child towards Earth)
-Nostalghia (final Domenico/Andrei sequences + final shot)
-Brazil (funeral + vertigo + underground chase + home sweet home + torture chair)
-Blade Runner (Deckard vs Roy in the Bradford + metaphysical and physical ascension + tears in rain + Deckard/Rachel escape)
-Aliens (going back to rescue little girl + finale vs Queen + escape + surprise)
-Mulholland Drive (everything switches around and comes full circle)  note: would have to watch again to be certain of its inclusion and rank (don’t remember exactly how long the whole finale is [probably 30 min more], where to cut it, or exactly how amazing the last 15 min of it are)
-Touch of Evil (Entire sequence of attempting to get Quinlan’s confession + final shootout + death + “metaphor for the end of Welles/film noir” fade out)
-Earth (Multi-faceted montage finale)
-The Wild Bunch (final shootout + closing scene)
-Possession (ascending the staircase + multiple deaths/doppelganger + child's bath + marriage as metaphor for WW III)
-Lady from Shanghai (Welles descends through crazy house + mirrors + death scenes)
-Vertigo (Revisiting the Mission + dramatic ascension + reliving the fall as cure for vertigo)
-The Killer (shoot out in Church + blind lovers)
-Taxi Driver (suicide mission + taking Betsy home)
-Come & See (Hitler in reverse + POV onto the next battle)
-M (Trial + closing shot about protecting our children)
-Blow Up (no body + mimes + tennis + fade out of existence)
-It’s a Wonderful Life (joyous return to the present)
-Chinatown (Chinatown sequence)
-Rosemary’s Baby (Rosemary, in between a dream and reality, leaves bed and confronts her neighbors as Satanists, her husband as cohort and the Devil’s baby as her own)

NOTE: I’d probably include Hard Boiled but I have no idea where to cut it so that the ending is relatively “short” enough – the hospital finale is long and continuous. Same with Metropolis: the final hour-ish is continuous and is probably the greatest sequence in film history.

Several others came VERY close and deserve serious consideration (in no particular order): Dead Man, Synecdoche New York, Greed, Seventh Continent, North by Northwest, Color of Paradise, Werckmeister Harmonies, Landscape in the Mist, Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia, Repulsion, Aguirre the Wrath of God, Citizen Kane, Ikiru, Kiss Me Deadly, Sunset Boulevard, Blue Angel, Delicatessen, Funny Games, Dressed to Kill, What Ever Happened to Baby Jane, Hush Hush Sweet Charlotte, The Godfather, Godfather Part 2, Star Wars, L’Age d’Or, Time, Dr Strangelove, King of New York, Eraserhead, Freaks, Pi, 12 Monkeys, Sacrifice, Dr Akagi, Underground, Stalker, Blow Out, La Dolce Vita, 8 ½, Satantango, The Traveling Players, Eternity and a Day, Nashville, Europa, Michael Clayton, The Professional, Pulp Fiction, The Circus, Limelight, Memento, Dr Akagi, Zardoz, Persona, Mirror, Solaris, Dancer in the Dark, The Fountain, Black Swan, Requiem for a Dream, 21 Grams, Memento, Mean Streets, Ballad of Narayama, Last Tango in Paris, Apocalypse Now, Cabinet of Dr Caligari, Reservoir Dogs, Melancholia, Breaking the Waves, The Kingdom, Lost Highway, Secret Ceremony, Petulia, Giant, Rules of the Game, Insignificance, The Willow Tree, Southland Tales, Uncle Boonmee, etc, etc, etc – most of the films on my Extended List have great endings.

Thanks for that, the fact that I've seen over three quarters of the main list means that I'm on my way to watching the best movies. Unfortunately, I'm at the stage where I have seen them all only once, and have to rewatch them. I may be freeing up even more time on my already sparse schedule, so I'll jump into that.

If I had to pick from memory, I'd go with 2001, Come and See, City Lights, Brazil, and the Kingdom, if you count it as a movie, off the top of my head. Get on Riget II!

Whoops, forgot Face/Off (boat chase + final duel + familial return and addition) and North by Northwest (scaling the faces of Mt Rushmore + near death + jump cut to honeymoon), both of which would probably be in the top 20 above so we might remove the two Polanski's to make room... hmmmmm... it's too close to call... whatever...

So nice to come back to Listology and see that you have come around on what might be my favorite film of all time, Brazil!

"Come around"? :) I've rated it 9.2/10 for the last few years! But anyway, nice to have you back! We were gonna start playing "Where's Waldo" around here! :)

Touch of Evil over Citizen Kane, nice to see that. Welles' best film IMO

Possibly :) We'll see if it holds with Citizen Kane screaming at me to move it to #1 over the last couple weeks. Whether I do so or not, the difference is marginal - both are 2 of the greatest works of art in history.

I see you have Sunrise by Murnau rated at an 8.5. After seeing it in the Sight and Sound poll, and in the Top 10, I am intrigued by it.
What is your opinion of it and what should I be expecting in order to get the most out of the film?

Also, any plans to rewatch Tokyo Story? I have watched it 3 times this week and it has cracked my top 10. Beautiful.

Sunrise is incredible. It's poetic and like a fairytale. It submerges the viewer in a dreamy world of surreal romanticism. The environments become extensions of the characters states of mind, and it uses amazing silent film era special effects that, like films such as Metropolis and Faust, still astonish to this day for their ingenuity, craft and expressiveness. Visually it was way ahead of its time. Combined with Murnau's famed camera movement, several sequences become virtually 3D.

I've seen Tokyo Story 5 times I think. Relatively speaking (compared to a masterpiece in my own criteria), I doubt it has enough layers of content/meaning/depth etc and/or enough emotional power from start to finish, to change much in rating. But I'd love to have more Japenese films at or near the top so I'm all for it if that changes at some point for me. Still, it's difficult to imagine it rating much higher on my scale (maybe 7.5 instead of 7.3, but is it more amazing than the likes of Werckmeister Harmonies, Synecdoche NY, Spring Summer Fall Winter and Spring, etc?). That said, it's last 1/4 or 1/3 or so is very moving and usually draws some tears, or nearly so. But if you want a comparison in terms of a 7.5 like Tokyo Story vs a masterpiece, I find Kurosawa's Ikiru vastly superior (even if less "subtle"). It accomplishes much more depth imo while being even more moving from start to finish.

one more thing...

do you think bluray quality will improve Sunrise if I choose to buy it?

YES, absolutely get Blu Ray, but see if the quality rates high on a site such as Slant Magazine first. Some companies do cheap jobs even with Blu Ray and this site is good at telling the truth in that regard (plus has well written, interesting reviews of the films themselves).

Ikiru moved up from #26 to #24 ... Rear Window, from 7.3 to 7.4 ...

You know what I was just thinking? Was just thinking about how Mr. Arkadin, a film I should prob rate higher and will prob rate higher upon another viewing, is like an amassment of Citizen Kane and North By Northwest.

I've thought that exact same comparison before :)

Have you watched Alien?

Yes, it's great. At worst a "high" 7 (7.2), but probably should be on this list ... just haven't watched it in a few years and need to see it again to be sure

I'm going back through many films as well as discovering a slew of new ones. Expect lots of changes -- too many to bother accounting for all of them on my "top 10 albums and movies of the week" list. A majority of the ones I am re-watching are getting re-rated. Every time I make my rounds through these films and new ones, my understanding of the art form has increased, thus the changes.

See my "NOTE" above, between my 7.7/10 & 7.8/10 ratings, for a general update regarding this list.

Okay ... it's been an exhausting/rewarding few weeks of film watching. I believe this list is now updated to the point where it includes every 7.3+ film I presently consider worthy -- though, it's somewhat inaccurate, especially 7.7 on down, on where they rate/rank. Several of the 7.3-7.5 are probably 7.6-7.7, and perhaps 7.8+, if I were to re-watch them, and there's probably a handful of 7.8-8.2's that are actually 8.3+ ... Per the "law of averages" (if it even applies to such a thing as this) there will likely be a handful more 7.6's, 7.7's, 8.2's and 8.7's to add, as these are each very slim relative to the other ratings. These will either come from what's already on here being upgraded, or the dozens (I estimate 150 minimum) of films yet to see that will probably make 7.3+... That means I estimate this list should be at least 500 strong...

Some films I highly recommend (including my personal ratings)

Alex Cox: Repo Man (1984) 7.4/10
David Fincher: Fight Club (1999) 7.8/10
Stanley Kubrick: The Shining (1980) 8.4/10 [an insightful review by Roger Ebert]
Richard Linklater: Waking Life (2001) 7.2/10

Also, have you considered extending this list into the 7/10 range or is 7.3/10 the permanent cut-off point?

Thanks, I currently rate Repo Man, Fight Club and Waking Life in the 7 - 7.2 range. The Shining is 7.5 on this list (but has been as high as 8.8+ for me before). I've considered extending it, but if I do, would likely only be done after I fill out the 7.3+ range (probably 500+ entries).

I just watched Meshes of the Afternoon and, well, I enjoyed the surreal atmosphere and visuals but I don't see what makes it an 8/10? I'd like to see your interpretation of the events...

Well the film is short and I'm not going to go into it shot-by-shot for a full interpretation, but... the film has a haunting dream logic... Much of it is POV... it has an extraordinary and surreal visual sense and sense of movement w/ several scenes from that POV capturing the feeling of slowly falling or levitating ... the film is short but may be a metaphoric nightmare on an eternal cycle of birth-to-death ... the character's movement seems to be not of this world, seems to be trapped, disoriented in an out-of-body experience following death, then re-experiencing its fleeting sensations over and over in different alterations of memory/reality/surreality, but continually flummoxed -- as if, once outside her body she no longer understands the world around her and isn't subject to the laws of the physical universe, continually fraught by re-experiencing/acting out her recent death -- fixated and confused by this incident, by what happened to her...

I got all that, but still thought the film was worth at most a 7.5/10. Oh well.....

Well then, there you go. It's all subjective...

Amazing 3 1/2 minute excerpt/tribute to Tarkovsky's Nostalghia, perhaps the most profoundly moving film ever made:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XyrReJTZqQ0

they don't shoot pictures created this list of the most acclaimed directors of the 21st century.

http://www.theyshootpictures.com/21stcentury_top50directors.htm

What do you think?

Looks pretty accurate as most acclaimed. Not really sure who I would consider the best of the decade. Lynch or Haneke probably

You forgot to add Dial M for Murder to the list!

Whoops -- thanks, I'll add it as soon as I figure out where

NOTE: This list is going through changes right now. There are currently several omissions and also the order is not as reliable as it could be (it's fine in parts but not so much in others). I'll be updating it bit by bit in the near future.

Regardless, it is likely that all (or virtually all) of the films listed are still worthy of the list (7.3+) so they all remain highly recommended even if their exact ratings/rankings aren't currently "perfect". It is more likely that a good number of the selections will move up the ratings rather than down, and that in due time several will be added to the 7.3-7.7 range that hadn't been listed yet.

About your list I miss these titles
2.Metropolis-Lang (1927) ["The Complete Metropolis", 147 minutes]
4.Brazil-Gilliam (1985) [The Final Cut, 142 minutes]
5.Nostalghia-Tarkovsky (1983)
10.The Kingdom-Von Trier (1994)
11.Greed-Von Stroheim (1924) [Studio Cut, 140 minutes]
16.Landscape in the Mist-Angelopoulos (1988)
25.The Traveling Players-Angelopoulos (1975)
31.The Color of Paradise-Majidi (1998)
37.The Cook, The Thief, His Wife & Her Lover-Greenaway (1989)
41.City of Lost Children-Jeunet (1995)
44.Miracle in Milan-De Sica (1951)
45.The Man With A Movie Camera-Vertov (1928)
51.Earth-Dovzhenko (1930)
52.Satantango-Tarr (1994)
54.Wings of Desire-Wenders (1987)
58.Zardoz-Boorman (1972)
61.12 Monkeys-Gilliam (1995)
62.Dr. Akagi-Imamura (1998)
64.The Blue Angel-Von Sternberg (1930)
69.Europa-Von Trier (1991)
71.Secret Ceremony-Losey (1968)
Viridiana
86.La Strada-Fellini (1954)
87.Eternity and a Day-Angelopoulos (1998)
91.The Last Laugh-Murnau (1924)
92.A Face in the Crowd-Kazan (1957)
93.Reservoir Dogs-Tarantino (1992)
94.Leon: The Professional-Besson (1994)
95.Close Encounters of the Third Kind-Spielberg (1977)
96.The Seven Samurai-Kurosawa (1954)
97.To Be or Not To Be-Lubitsch (1947)
98.Why Has Bodhi-Dharma Left for the East?-Yong-kyun (1989)
101.Hard Boiled-Woo (1992)
104.The Road Warrior-Miller (1981)
107.Dead Man-Jarmusch (1995)
108.Sansho the Bailiff-Mizoguchi (1954)
110.The Pillow Book-Greenaway

Out of those, I'd probably recommend these ones the most strongly to you:

Nostalghia-Tarkovsky (1983)
Landscape in the Mist-Angelopoulos (1988)
The Color of Paradise-Majidi (1998)
Wings of Desire-Wenders (1987)
Europa-Von Trier (1991)
Eternity and a Day-Angelopoulos (1998)
Dead Man-Jarmusch (1995)
Sansho the Bailiff-Mizoguchi (1954)

Damn, I have so many films to watch :o I hope by next month, there would be only around 300 films on this list left to watch though.

Good luck, it took me awhile too :-)